Escape to what has been named the most magical destination in Toronto, but most people call it High Park. A place where your mind, body, and soul will relax and become one with nature.

 

High Park Trackless Trains offer a great way for plant enthusiasts, animal lovers, hippies, and budding entomologists to go exploring. Here, the wildlife is flourishing, and the grounds provide a safe home for a multitude of wild animals. Stop by High Park Trackless Trains to enjoy a one-of-a-kind experience with Mother Nature.

- Tour Toronto's Grandest Natural Park -

History

       In 1836, John George Howard purchased a 160-acre (65 ha) property in the County of York, to the west of Toronto, for a sheep farm, at the cost of $1,000.00. It was here that Howard designed and built Colborne Lodge, a Regency-style cottage in 1837 to complement its natural surroundings, as the residence for himself and his wife. The Howards named their property 'High Park' as it was situated on the highest point of land along the Humber Bay shoreline.  

       In 1873, Howard and his wife agreed to convey their country property to the City of Toronto. There were several conditions to the conveyance, including that the Howards continue to live at their residence, no alcohol ever be served in the park, and that the City hold the park "for the free use, benefit and enjoyment of the Citizens of Toronto for ever and to be called and designated at all times thereafter High Park".

       The Howards are buried in High Park, under a stone monument that is fronted by a portion of ornate fencing from St. Paul's Cathedral in London, England, across the street from Colborne Lodge. Today, Colborne Lodge is a museum containing many of the original Howard furnishings including John Howard's water colours of early Toronto. The museum is open year-round.